JOOST KEIZER
M.A., Rijkuniversiteit Groningen, 2003
Ph.D., Universiteit Leiden, 2008
Assistant Professor, History of Art
joost.keizer@yale.edu

Joost Keizer received his MA. from the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen in 2003, and his Ph.D. from the Universiteit Leiden in 2008. Before coming to Yale, he was Mellon Postdoctoral fellow and Lecturer at Columbia University, 2008-2010.

His research focuses on Italian Renaissance art, from 1300 to 1550. He is interested in art and politics, allegory, and mimesis.

His first book, Michelangelo and the Politics of History (forthcoming with Yale University Press, 2014) studies Michelangelo's response to political change in the city of Florence during the last decade of the fifteenth century and first decades of the sixteenth century. A second book, The Realism of Piero della Francesca (under review), studies the depiction of contemporary life in the art of Piero della Francesca.

He is currently working on a book on allegory in art around 1500, the names
of fifteenth-century artists, and portraiture.


Selected Publications
Michelangelo and the Politics of Art (New Haven and London: Yale University
Press, forthcoming 2014).

The Realism of Piero della Francesca (under review).

“Dürer, Drawing, and Allegory,” in The Aura of the Word in the Age of Print, ed. Jessica Buskirk and Samuel Mareel (Forthcoming 2014).

“Leonardo and Allegory,” Oxford Art Journal 35.3 (October 2012): 433-55.

“Michelangelo, Drawing and the Subject of Art,” The Art Bulletin 93 (September 2011): 304-24.

With Todd M. Richardson, “Introduction: The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts,” in The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts, ed. Joost Keizer and Todd M. Richardson, Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2011, 1-23.

The Transformation of Vernacular Expression in Early Modern Arts, ed. Joost Keizer and Todd M. Richardson, Leiden and Boston: Brill Academic Publishers, 2011.

“Michelangelo Out of Focus: Medievalism as Absent Life in Italian Renaissance Art,” in Early Modern Medievalisms: The Interplay between Scholarly Reflection and Artistic Production, ed. Alicia Montoya, Wim van Anrooij and Sophie van Romburgh, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2010, 391-425.

“Giuliano Salviati, Michelangelo and the ‘David’,” The Burlington Magazine 150 (October 2008): 664-68.